PEOPLE’S POPS

Every summer in our part of the world is hot, so hot that you barely want to move. And this summer seems particularly, endlessly hot. By the end of August, we will all be looking forward to the coolness that comes with fall. Until then, Maggie and I are cooling off with afternoon dips in the pool, ice cream treats from our local shops, and recipes from People’s Pops: 55 Recipes for Ice Pops, Shave Ice, and Boozy Pops from Brooklyn’s Coolest Pop Shop - which can be compared to eating lightly sweetened, frozen fruit on a stick.

My friend Nathalie Jordi and her partners at People’s Pops started making their incredibly popular ice pops in Brooklyn, New York, during the summer of 2008. From their website, “We transform local, sustainably grown fruits and herbs into creative, delicious hand-made ice pops and shaved ice…” Check out their blog here.

Luckily for us, their book, the self titled People’s Pops, was released at the beginning of this summer season. Fitting their commitment to local, sustainable community, the recipes are organized by season, which makes it easy to select ingredients from the farmer’s market or right from the garden.

The book is a delight to the senses, filled with simple recipes using common popsicle ingredients like strawberries or cherries, and not-so-common ingredients like cucumber and violet, or honeydew and ginger. Jennifer May’s beautify photographs capture the popsicles’ textures and colors, and some of the many people who enjoy them. Reading through, it is hard to decide on which recipe to make first.

Since my son Zach’s watermelons are perfectly ripened and ready to eat, we selected Watermelon & Parsley using his watermelon and fresh mint, acquired last year from Shamrock Farms.

Olivia happened upon Blueberry Moonshine for sale during our visit to Penland last month (I would really like to hear that story), so we decided this was the perfect opportunity to make some “boozy” summer popsicles.

Thank you to NathaliePeople’s Pops, and Ten Speed Press for a great new addition to my cookbook collection and for Maggie’s absolute favorite recipes of the summer.  Finally, an ice pop that is good for breakfast (and another for evening cocktail time).  xoNatalie

WATERMELON + PARSLEY

MAKES 10 POPS

2/3 pounds whole watermelon (about 1/2 of a bowling ball–sized watermelon)
3/4 cup (6 fl oz) simple syrup (page 7), or more if needed
20 leaves fresh flat-leaf parsley

Peel and coarsely chop the watermelon. You should have about a quart of watermelon pieces. Purée the watermelon, leaving chunks if you like, as long as they’re small enough to pour into the molds. You should have about 2 1/4 cups (18 fl oz) of purée.

Transfer the puréed watermelon to a bowl or measuring pitcher with a pouring spout. Mix the simple syrup into the puréed watermelon until it tastes quite sweet. Chop the parsley very finely and add it to the mixture.

Pour the mixture into your ice pop molds, leaving a little bit of room at the top for the mixture to expand. Insert sticks and freeze until solid, 4 to 5 hours. Unmold and transfer to plastic bags for storage or serve at once.

SIMPLE SYRUP

2/3 cup (5 oz) organic cane sugar
2/3 cup (5 fl oz) water

Combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves and the mixture is transparent. Turn off the heat and let cool. Add any spices before the mixture starts to simmer; add any herbs only after you’ve turned off the heat. Store plain and infused syrups in sealed containers in the fridge.

Makes 1 cup (8 fl oz)

BLUEBERRY MOONSHINE

MAKES 10 POPS

1 pound 6 ounces (4 3/4 cups) blueberries
2/3 cup (5 fl oz) simple syrup (page 7)
2 tablespoons (1 fl oz) freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/3 cup (3 fl oz) moonshine

Pick out any stems or leaves from the blueberries and purée them in a food processor. You should have about 2 1/4 cups (18 fl oz) of purée.

Combine the puréed blueberries, simple syrup, and lemon juice in a bowl or measuring pitcher with a pouring spout. Taste; the precise amount of simple syrup and lemon juice needed will depend on how sweet the berries were to begin with. Be aware that blueberries are one of the rare fruits that you don’t want to over-sweeten because they tend to get sweeter as they freeze. Stir in the moonshine.

If you wish, now is the time to strain out the skins by pressing the gloppy blueberry mixture though a colander or sieve using a wooden spoon, a rubber spatula, or your fist (blueberries stain skin, so those choosing the third route might want to wear gloves). Or don’t, and leave them in.

Pour the mixture into your ice pop molds, leaving a little bit of room at the top for the mixture to expand. Insert sticks and freeze until solid, 4 to 5 hours. Unmold and transfer to plastic bags for storage or serve at once.

SIMPLE SYRUP

2/3 cup (5 oz) organic cane sugar
2/3 cup (5 fl oz) water

Combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves and the mixture is transparent. Turn off the heat and let cool. Add any spices before the mixture starts to simmer; add any herbs only after you’ve turned off the heat. Store plain and infused syrups in sealed containers in the fridge.

Makes 1 cup (8 fl oz)

*Reprinted with permission from People’s Pops: 55 Recipes for Ice Pops, Shave Ice, and Boozy Pops from Brooklyn’s Coolest Pop Shop by Nathalie Jordi, David Carrell, and Joel Horowitz, copyright © 2012. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group.

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5 thoughts on “PEOPLE’S POPS

    1. Alabama Post author

      Brenda,

      This dress was made out of recycled t-shirts. The style will featured in our new collection, which will be available soon.

      Reply
  1. Lisa

    Try freezing the watermelon chunks before you puree with the parsley. The parsley will be less likely to float. This works with any recipe with a lot of clear liquid and herbs. I’ve been ice pop crazed this summer, and made lavender lemonade and grapefruit mint with this method.

    Reply

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