Category Archives: DIY + SEWING

CUSTOM DIY: ANNA’S GARDEN WITH COUCHING

Custom DIY: ANNA'S GARDEN COUCHING

Couching is one of the more sculptural techniques that we use to embellish garments at Alabama Chanin. The effect adds a unique texture and visual appeal.

Traditional couching is a very old technique where yarn (or another material) is laid across fabric and sewn into place, creating shapes and patterns. Our process of couching involves stitching cotton jersey ropes to an stenciled base fabric.

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DIY MEN’S EAGLE T-SHIRT

DIY MEN'S EAGLE T-SHIRT

The Eagle T-Shirt is the second in a new series of Men’s DIY projects, designed in a style that is flattering to both men and women. The Eagle stencil has been in the Alabama Chanin library for several years now. We shared instructions on how to create the stencil and apply it to a basic recycled t-shirt in 2008. (Read more about that here). Since those early years, we’ve designed and created patterns for Alabama Chanin original t-shirts, which you can see on Natalie’s son, Zach, above.

The long sleeve t-shirt is made with our 100% organic cotton jersey and constructed with floating outside seams that add a nuanced detail, emphasizing the hand-stitched quality, though you can make your own design decisions.

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WHOLESOME WAVE GEORGIA + TWO SKIRTS

WHOLESOME WAVE GEORGIA

Last October, we held a One-Day Workshop in Atlanta, Georgia. DIY Kits for the workshop had been cut, packaged, and shipped days before the event, but they never arrived in Atlanta, lost in transit. This was a workshop crisis. However, this particular workshop turned out to be one of our best to date. In a beautiful expression of communal crafting, twelve people collaborated to create two Alabama Chanin Swing Skirts from the only kits I happened to carry with me. While we were initially disappointed over the lost box, we soon learned of the people in the Northeast who lost lives and homes as Hurricane Sandy beat down on the New Jersey and New York shores. We didn’t know how lucky we were.

WHOLESOME WAVE GEORGIA

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DIY YOHJI YAMAMOTO

DIY YOHJI YAMAMOTO - Photograph by Abraham Rowe

Yohji Yamamoto has been a hero of mine since I graduated from design school. I once saw him walking down the streets of Milan, Italy, not long after I started working in the New York garment district, and felt that I had made the big time. “Walking on the same street as Yohji Yamamoto?” I thought.  It was a momentary highlight in my career that I remember like it was yesterday.

He is known as an avant garde Japanese designer and famous for his intricate designs and impeccable tailoring. He often experiments with different draping methods and varied fabric textures. Yamamoto is also known to integrate wabi sabi, an ever-changing state of beauty, simplicity, and asymmetry, combined with an appreciation for natural elements, into his design aesthetic.

The fashion website Showstudio launched Design Download – “a series demystifying the fashion process by offering prestigious designer garment patterns for download” –  with a Yamamoto pattern for a jacket in classic Yamamoto style. He remained mysterious about the process, revealing very little, and challenging the maker to pay close attention to detail, shape, and technique. There is no “how-to,” like you would find with a traditional pattern. Design Download calls this piece a “mystery garment,” telling the reader that the “photographs of the piece hold the visual key to stitching together your own.”

DIY YOHJI YAMAMOTO - Photograph by Abraham Rowe

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DESKTOP OF THE MONTH: SEPTEMBER 2013

DESKTOP OF THE MONTH: SEPTEMBER 2013

September’s Desktop of the Month illustrates the strength of contrasting color choices in a fabric design. Red and blue elements, when placed beside a light, neutral tone, bring a strong focus to the image or pattern – in this case, long-time favorite, Angie’s Fall. Additionally, placing some of the knots on the outside of the design adds a textural element that draws the eye to the embroidered stencil shapes.

This hi-resolution photograph, for use as your computer desktop background, is now available to download from our Resources page.

The photograph above highlights one of the many options available when creating a Custom DIY Kit. There are hundreds of options to choose from, including fabric, colors, thread, stencil, embroidery or treatment, and garment or item. View our Alabama Chanin Custom DIY Guide for ideas to create your own project. Click here to design your own Custom DIY Kit.

OUR DESIGN CHOICES

Fabric – 100% organic medium-weight cotton jersey
Backing layer – Midnight
Top layer – Natural
Stencil – Angie’s Fall
Treatment – Backstitch reverse appliqué
Textile paint – Light Grey
Thread – Red #128
Knots – both outside and inside; outside knots strategically placed for design emphasis

 

DIY APRON + TEA TOWELS

DIY APRON + TEA TOWELS

If any of you are like me, when preparing food, you end up with at least a modest amount of flour, eggs, or whatever you’ve cooked for dinner all over your clothes. (Close family members also know that I am notorious for dropping food, plates, and glasses.)  Anyone will acknowledge that this is not a good look when you have visitors over for coffee or dinner. I always keep several aprons on hand for myself or for visitors or little ones who want to help in the kitchen.

We also go through an incredible number of towels in our kitchen. Perhaps I’m messier than I’d like to admit (maybe I can blame that on Maggie). It seems that I always have plenty of dishes that need drying or hands that need wiping. These Tea Towels work perfectly as a napkin or a makeshift bib for messy foods, too. They can be sewn up so quickly that I keep the necessary supplies on hand in case I need a hostess gift.

DIY APRON + TEA TOWELS

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STENCILED FAT EIGHTHS

STENCILED FAT EIGHTHS

A “Fat Eighth” is a term well known to many quilters and practiced crafters. For those of you who have never seen or used them, Fat Eighths are bundles of 1/8 yard cuts of fabric often used by quilters to make patchwork patterns. This technique allows makers to create a varied, often colorful quilt that features an array of techniques, shapes, and patterns.

We began offering basic Fat Eighths and Stenciled Fat Eighths in our DIY Store when we learned just how many uses our Studio Book readers were finding for scraps and small pieces of fabric. These fabric squares have uses that stretch far beyond quilting. Readers have related using them as appliqué pieces, shared stories of using the squares to patch holes in well-loved garments, and even reported using scraps as gift wrap. We designed a Quilt of the Month that featured Stenciled Fat Eighths, which was simple, colorful, quite beautiful, and a quick project for both beginning and advanced stitchers.

We have added new options to our selection of Stenciled Fat Eighths: Paisley and Anna’s Garden stenciled squares. In combination with our popular Facets pattern, these options should allow you greater artistic freedom when designing your projects. All Fat Eighths are 9” x 20” and are cut from our 100% organic medium weight cotton jersey. Your stencil selection will be sprayed on each fabric square using our Cream colored textile paint. The bundle contains 25 squares and you can choose from Color Card 1 or 2, or purchase both.

Visit our website for more information on our Stenciled Fat Eighths here.

STENCILED FAT EIGHTHS

 

CUSTOM DIY: ANNA’S GARDEN CORSET

ANNA'S GARDEN CORSET

The Alabama Corset is one of our signature pieces and, over the years, has proven to be the perfect canvas for a wide variety of colorways and techniques. Shown here in Anna’s Garden reverse appliqué, the garment is created by joining two layers of fabric. The top layer is stenciled, then the maker stitches around each of the individual stenciled shapes with thread to create the pattern and join the two layers. After sewing, the inside top layer of each stitched shape is cut away to reveal the backing fabric underneath.

Using our Custom DIY options, you can choose every aspect of a reverse appliqué garment to fit your style and personality. For instance, you can go for a subtle, yet beautiful tone-on-tone approach, as we have shown here. Or, you may choose a high contrast option for your backing and top layers. The Corset shown above is just one example of how you might create your own garment. The technique can be applied to any garment or project and is equally beautiful with bold colors or other neutral tones. View the Custom DIY Guide for more information on your options.

OUR DESIGN CHOICES

Fabric weight – Alabama Chanin 100% organic medium-weight cotton jersey
Backing fabric color – Sand
Top layer color – Sand
Stencil – Anna’s Garden
Embroidery Technique – reverse appliqué (instructions available in Alabama Studio Sewing + Design)
Button Craft thread – Cream #256
Textile paint color – White
Rib embroidery – Cretan stitch

 

LAMP SHADES + T-SHIRT ROPES

LAMP SHADES + T-SHIRT ROPES

Past & Present is a collection of essays on decorative art history and DIY projects by Design Sponge columnist, Amy Azzarito. Grace Bonney, founder of the very popular Design Sponge website, first met Amy while working on a video project at the New York Public Library. The two became instant friends, as Grace was impressed with Amy’s knowledge and passion for design and the history behind it. Thus the column, Past & Present, was born. In this book, Amy highlights some of her favorite styles in the history of decorative arts and pairs her essays with advice from various designers on creating DIY projects that reflect the eras she writes about.

We chose to create one of the projects, using our 100% organic cotton jersey, to make a Shaker-style hanging lamp.

LAMP SHADES + T-SHIRT ROPES

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A RECIPE FOR PRINTING

A RECIPE FOR PRINTING

Yesterday, we heard from Heather Wylie about her Bohemian Bop venture, her love of printmaking, and how she got into screen printing t-shirts. Today, Heather shares with us a recipe for screen printing at home, based on her own self-taught experience and by following You Tube videos and a few books on the subject, including Printing by Hand: A Modern Guide to Printing with Handmade Stamps, Stencils and Silk Screens by Lena Corwin, which we wrote about here a few years ago.

As Heather mentioned yesterday, printmaking requires many steps and each step demands careful attention in order to get the desired outcome. Anyone can print at home, but it is a lengthy process.

A RECIPE FOR PRINTING

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