Category Archives: THE SCHOOL OF MAKING

ZKANO ORGANIC SOCKS (AND A DIY PROJECT)

Zkano Grey Thigh High Socks

My friend Kay and I started giving one another socks for each holiday several years ago. Although this may bring back memories of dreaded Christmas gifts from years past (not socks again!), I find the gift of socks a very practical thing. It’s just not one of those things that I go out and purchase for myself on a regular basis—but, anyone who has had to show their threadbare socks in public understands that such a reveal can cause major embarrassment. Think back to that cliché, “Always wear clean underwear because you never know where you will find yourself.”

Zkano Knee Socks

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PICK 5: A RECIPE FOR CHANGE

PICK 5: A RECIPE FOR CHANGE

I’ve written before about the importance of organic cotton and the residual chemical damage traditional cotton leaves behind in our land and our bodies. As many of you know, we planted and raised our own organic cotton here in Alabama last summer, and every Alabama Chanin product is made with 100% organic cotton. We are a sustainable design company, making as much use of everything we have so that we throw away very, very little. Cotton scraps become pulls for tying hair or curtains, smaller pieces are reworked into something larger. In honor of Earth Day this coming Monday, we’ve taken the EPA Pick 5 challenge to go a little deeper and consider some ways cotton can be reworked into our daily routines.

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NOP AND GOTS

NOP AND GOTS

As readers of our journal, many of you have read about our attempts to grow organic cotton here in Alabama. While researching the process and details of what it means to grow organic cotton, we discovered, to our surprise, that only a small amount of the world’s organic cotton is grown in the United States. We are part of an effort to change that, as are other companies, like Zkano. We must ask the questions – What makes cotton organic? Who makes the rules? And who regulates the whole system?

A food or agricultural product can be labeled as organic, meaning that it was inspected and met the USDA’s established regulations for organic products. Organic products cannot be grown using chemical fertilizers or any type of genetic engineering, among other criteria.  The National Organic Program (NOP) oversees all organic crops, including raw cotton fibers. While food crops and products must meet very rigid requirements to be labeled as organic, the same does not hold true for fibers or the products made with those fibers. While the NOP makes rules and manages the process of certifying cotton fiber as organic, it doesn’t make any rules about what happens to the fiber after it has been harvested.

NOP AND GOTS

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MARIMEKKO + CONVERSE

MARIMEKKO + CONVERSE

“One has to dream.  And one has to stand out from the rest.” – Armi Raita, Marimekko creator

I’ve been wearing Converse sneakers for years. They’re comfortable, durable, inexpensive, and I love them with our hand-stitched garments.  Just in case I wasn’t standing out from the rest already, Marimekko + Converse should grab some attention, right?

MARIMEKKO + CONVERSE

 

P.S. Refinery29 is sharing this DIY Missoni-style sneaker project. Make your own DIY Marimekko sneakers?

 

DUST TO DIGITAL: I LISTEN TO THE WIND

I LISTEN TO THE WIND

Last  week  we wrote about Dust-to-Digital’s Drop on Down in Florida, a 2 CD release highlighting African American music traditions in Florida, paired with a 224-page hardcover book. Dust-to-Digital is a unique recording company: part archivist, part celebrator of cultural artifacts. We will be talking about several of these awesome (by the original definition) releases over the next few weeks.

…i listen to the wind that obliterates my traces: music in vernacular photographs, compiled by Steve Roden, is a 2 CD set and 184-page hardback book exploring an unusual collection of recordings and old photographs related to music.

I LISTEN TO THE WIND

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ALABAMA CHANIN @ SOUTHERN MAKERS

ALABAMA CHANIN @ SOUTHERN MAKERS

Southern Makers is a one day event that celebrates creativity of all types in Alabama. Our state has a rich artisanal history in textiles, food, farming, literature, art and design. Southern Makers will explore Alabama-based food and design with panel discussions, artist talks, cooking demonstrations and tastings, workshops, and a Market Place Bazaar featuring wares and goods from talented southern artisans and chefs.

Panel discussion with Natalie Chanin and other participants on Transportation and Traditional Industries @ 6pm.

Alabama Chanin Two-Hour Workshop with Natalie + staff @ 2:30 pm.

$155 includes all materials to complete an Alabama Chanin DIY kit for the workshop only.

Register here for the Two-Hour Workshop.

*Event is open to the general public – $10 advance ticket/ $20 at the door. Additional fees for workshops, beer garden, and purchase of craft items.

**All proceeds from the event will benefit EAT South, a non-profit organization, committed to promoting sustainable growth through education, agriculture, and sustainable design.

 

DOO-NANNY

Doo-Nanny

This weekend marks the 15th year of the Doo-Nanny festival, simply called ‘Doo-Nanny’. The folk art festival has grown and evolved into a temporary community filled with creative expression that occupies Butch’s 80-acre farm once a year.

When Butch speaks of the history of Doo-Nanny, his story begins with a turnip root that was plowed up in his garden by friend John Henry Toney. The turnip “had a face in it,” so he drew a picture of it and sold in a nearby junk shop to a folk art collector. And so, in 1996, Doo-Nanny was born out of a roadside art show. Years later, the folk art festival merged with a “lo-fi” movie festival and is now complete with solar showers, an outdoor community kitchen, art vendors, and culminates with a burning effigy for the celebration on Saturday night.

Ready for art and making, campers, artists, musicians, and free spirits arrive here for fun, food, music, and experimental architecture. Children run free (but supervised). I’ve heard first-time attendees say nothing could have prepared them for the spectacle of the weekend; this year’s event is certain to be another good one.

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PHILLIP MARCH JONES

POINTS OF DEPARTURE by Phillip March Jones

Writer, artist, and curator Phillip March Jones’s latest book, Points of Departure, is a collection of roadside memorial Polaroids depicting scenes of reality, often stark eulogies on road sides, highways, and Interstates, that we routinely speed by in our busy lives. The collection demonstrates an irony between our hurried motion and the absoluteness of departure the memorials commemorate, as if the two, at least at moments, exist in parallel universes.

A busy man himself, Phillip March Jones is the founder of Institute 193 – a non-profit contemporary art space, small-scale publishing house, and cultural centre in Lexington, Kentucky – and the director of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, committed to raising public awareness of African-American vernacular art of the South. We were able to catch up with Jones for a quick Q&A about his newest book.

POINTS OF DEPARTURE by Phillip March Jones

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Q&A WITH ANNA MARIA HORNER+ A BOOK GIVEAWAY

NEEDLEWORK NOTEBOOK

We’ve been talking about friend and collaborator Anna Maria Horner all week, featuring a DIY A-line Tunic with her Little Flowers stencil, a Greek lunch in her honor, and a review of her new book, Anna Maria’s Needleworks Notebook, which we wrote about on Monday promising a giveaway later in the week. Details below on how to enter to win a copy of Anna Maria’s book, but first, a Q&A with the lady herself.

NATALIE AND ANNA MARIA

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YOU CAN’T FAKE FASHION (PART 2)

YOU CAN'T FAKE FASHION

In 2005, I was inducted into The Council of Fashion Designers of America.  Long before that time (and during my days as a stylist in Europe), I didn’t really know what the CFDA was (or did). However, the organization was founded in 1962 by Eleanor Lambert as a not-for-profit trade organization to support American womenswear, menswear, jewelry, and accessory designers. Today, the CFDA consists of over 400 members across the nation (we have 2 from Alabama). Their mission statement has grown to reflect a desire to “advance artistic and professional standards within the fashion industry, establish and maintain a code of ethics and practices of mutual benefit in professional, public, trade relations, promote and improve understanding and appreciation of the fashion arts through leadership in quality and taste, and to support the overall growth of American fashion as a global industry.”

Some of the programs growing out of this agency include the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund for which Alabama Chanin was a finalist in 2009 and which Billy Reid (the other CFDA member in the state of Alabama) won in 2010. Other programs include CFDA Fashion Awards, Made in Midtown, and the great {Fashion Incubator} program, among many others.

YOU CAN'T FAKE FASHION

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