A RECIPE FOR PRINTING

A RECIPE FOR PRINTING

Yesterday, we heard from Heather Wylie about her Bohemian Bop venture, her love of printmaking, and how she got into screen printing t-shirts. Today, Heather shares with us a recipe for screen printing at home, based on her own self-taught experience and by following You Tube videos and a few books on the subject, including Printing by Hand: A Modern Guide to Printing with Handmade Stamps, Stencils and Silk Screens by Lena Corwin, which we wrote about here a few years ago.

As Heather mentioned yesterday, printmaking requires many steps and each step demands careful attention in order to get the desired outcome. Anyone can print at home, but it is a lengthy process.

A RECIPE FOR PRINTING

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HEATHER WYLIE + BOHEMIAN BOP

HEATHER WYLIE + BOHEMIAN BOP

Heather Wylie is the daughter of Alabama Chanin friend and mentor Terry Wylie, and a welcome creative force in our shared factory space on Lane Drive. Heather is recently graduated from Parsons School of Design in New York, where she earned an MFA in Design and Technology. She learned printmaking as an undergrad at the University of Alabama, and it is her love of printing and her ingrained knowledge of the t-shirt business (thanks to Dad) that led her to create Bohemian Bop, a line of hand-printed, silkscreen and lace embellished tee shirts. We visited Heather’s studio to learn a little more about Bohemian Bop, her love of print making, and the future for Heather Wylie.

HEATHER WYLIE + BOHEMIAN BOP - photo by Valerie Crawford

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AMOS KENNEDY + THE PERFECT POSTER

AMOS KENNEDY + THE PERFECT POSTER

Amos Kennedy became an artist in an unusual way. At age 40, he left his corporate, white-collar job and secure middle class life to pursue a passion for printing, took to wearing overalls, and learned to live on an artist’s salary. He prints posters for The People, keeping the message clear and the price affordable. His work ranges from the inspirational to the informative, often creating and printing work for festivals and events. In 2008, film maker Laura Zinger directed “Proceed and Be Bold,” a documentary about Amos Kennedy and his non-traditional path into the art world.

AMOS KENNEDY + THE PERFECT POSTER

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EMILY SPIVACK + WORN STORIES

EMILY SPIVACK + WORN STORIES

Last year at MAKESHIFT 2012, one of our gatherings revolved around “Worn Stories,” an idea based on the blog, Sentimental Value, by Emily Spivack, friend of Jessamyn Hatcher. Spivack’s blog – and soon to be book, titled Worn Stories – shares the stories of garments purchased from Ebay. Those anecdotes were written by each item’s respective seller and, “are a window into people’s lives,” Spivack told the New York Times in a recent article highlighting her “Sentimental Value” exhibition at the Philadelphia Art Alliance.

Spivack also created and writes Threaded, the Smithsonian’s fashion history blog. Needless to say, Spivack has become an authority on connecting stories and clothing, which she views as works of art. Anyone who has ever made or purchased an Alabama Chanin garment knows the value we place on the quality, timelessness, and story of each project. Spivack’s mission rings very true for us.

Emily Spivack’s exhibit, Sentimental Value is on display through August 23,2013.

For more information, click here.

 

HÖFER’S LIBRARIES

HOFER'S LIBRARIES

We recently shared a few thoughts and memories of the library, collected from friends and neighbors, about the role libraries have played and continue to play in our lives. The draw of the library is foremost, the books. It is a democratic place to learn, escape, and relax. For many of us, the library conjures childhood memories of our local facility, perhaps a favorite librarian, and certainly the stack of literary treasures we inevitably brought home with us. German photographer Candida Höfer’s series of color plates, Libraries, captures the architecture and physical structures that hold those treasures and the art of those sacred halls.

This impressive volume contains 137 color plates of Höfer’s work, including the British Library in London, the Escorial in Spain, the Whitney Museum and the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York, the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris, the Villa Medici in Rome, and the Hamburg University Library, among many others. The images are mostly devoid of people, drawing the eye and mind not to the functionality of a space, but to the colors and aesthetic of a building with a single purpose.

HOFER'S LIBRARIES

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ALABAMA CHANIN IN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

ALABAMA CHANIN IN SAN FRANCISCO

San Francisco has long been a favorite city for Alabama Chanin, a place with long-standing friendships, and where we’ve met some of our biggest fans. This weekend and for a few days next week, Alabama Chanin is hosting a series of events in the city.

Join us:

Tonight, August 15, 2013
Southern at the Table

5:00pm – 8:00pm

Heath Ceramics
2900 18th Street
San Francisco, California 94110

The Southern Foodways Alliance highlights Southern food culture with a documentary on Tennessee barbecue pitmaster Helen Turner and we host a Southern at the Table marketplace featuring food products from small businesses throughout the South, including Jack Rudy, Farmer’s Daughter, Shotwell Candy Company, Anson Mills, Alabama Biscuit Company and Virginia Willis My Southern Pantry Heirloom Grits.

Twenty percent of Thursday evening’s sales will go to support La Cocina initiatives.

For more information on Southern at the Table visit here or contact office(at)alabamachanin.com.

August 15, 2013 – September 1, 2013
Home Trunk Show

Heath Ceramics
2900 18th Street
San Francisco, California 94110

A pop-up marketplace will be open in the Heath studio Thursday, August 15 through Monday, September 1, 2013, featuring gorgeous, hand sewn textiles for the table from Alabama Chanin, the new the Camellia dinnerware collaboration, and the continuation of the Southern food marketplace featuring southern-made goods including Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. Small Batch Tonic and Grenadine, Virginia Willis’ Stone Ground Grits, Alabama Biscuit Company’s Biscuit Mix, and others.

August 14, 2013 – August 26, 2013
Alabama Chanin Studio Style DIY Trunk Show (our first ever)

A Verb for Keeping Warm
6328 San Pablo Avenue
Oakland, CA 94608

Hours: Wednesday 11-7, Thursday 11-8, Friday 11-6, Saturday 10-6, Sunday 11-6, Monday 11-6, Tuesday Closed

Come see a variety of garments in various sizes, look through our swatch books, and imagine your DIY project. DIY kits, the Alabama Chanin Studio books, fabric and sewing notions will be for sale. 10% off DIY Kits. Bring in your Studio book (or buy a book) and receive 10% off Alabama Chanin organic cotton jersey fabric.

For more information, contact  A Verb for Keeping Warm: +1.510.595.8372

COLLECTION TRUNK SHOW

August 15, 2013 – August 16, 2013
Alabama Chanin Collection Trunk Show

Red Bird
By appointment only.

Special orders will be taken.
Contact: 510.644.0294

Saturday, August 17, 2013
One-Day Workshop

10:30 am – 5:30 pm

Heath Ceramics
2900 18th Street
San Francisco, California 94110

Our One-Day Workshop offers the Alabama Chanin experience in a casual, day-long session. Work with Natalie Chanin and our Alabama Chanin team to create one of our DIY Projects. Suited to beginners and experienced sewers alike.

SOLD OUT

For more information, contact Alabama Chanin: workshops (at) alabamachanin.com
or call Olivia at +1.256.760.1090

COLLECTION TRUNK SHOW

 

DIY KITE (+ BENJAMIN FRANKLIN)

DIY KITE

A ‘Founding Father’ of our country, Benjamin Franklin, was a Renaissance man with many skills, talents, achievements, and innovations. His professional life includes titles such as: scientist, activist, politician, postmaster, inventor, musician, and diplomat. An astute inventor, Franklin counted bifocals, the lightning rod, catheter, odometer, and glass harmonica among his inventions; he even mapped the Gulf Stream. By teaching and practicing the ideology of “paying it forward” and other social justices, he contributed to a greater society.

Benjamin Franklin saw potential in even the simplest things, perhaps most famously in the act of flying a kite. Stepping into a lightning storm with key, jar, and string in hand, he turned what would be a leisurely pastime for most into scientific research.

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PHILLIP MARCH JONES, COUNTY CLUB, AND A RECIPE

COUNTY CLUB - Photo by Phillip March Jones

We are pleased to welcome back friend and writer, Phillip March Jones, who we have convinced to join us as a regular contributor to this Journal. Phillip will be writing about art, visual design, music, food, and travel.

This week, Phillip shares a photo essay of (and a delicious recipe from) his new favorite restaurant, County Club, in Lexington, Kentucky. This new gathering spot is a stones-throw from Institute 193, Phillip’s gallery. Chef Johnny Shipley’s menu looks mouth-watering and County Club’s Instagram feed has me ready to jump on a plane to Lexington.

Please welcome Phillip with lots of comments below,

xoNatalie

Turner & Guyon, a design team based in Lexington, Kentucky, recently partnered with local chef Johnny Shipley, to transform an abandoned cinder block garage into a full-service restaurant and bar named County Club. The original structure, located on Jefferson Street in the historic Smithtown neighborhood, was built in 1974 as a storage facility for the Rainbow Bread factory’s day-old shop. The factory closed in the early 90′s, and the storage building was eventually purchased by a local man who used it as a garage and auto body shop.

Hunter Guyon and Chesney Turner (Turner & Guyon) have both lived within a few blocks of the building for years, and their familiarity with the neighborhood is evident in the restaurant’s interior, which is elegant, sparse, and comforting.

Memory is one of the driving forces behind both the restaurant’s design and menu, which explores new takes on classic barbecue dishes with a special focus on regionally sourced, in-house smoked meats. County Club, which only opened a few months ago, already feels deeply rooted in the fabric of Lexington’s food and social culture.

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CUSTOM DIY: APPLIQUE ROSE STENCIL

CUSTOM DIY: APPLIQUE ROSE STENCIL

Appliqué is one of the first embellishing techniques we learn when advancing our hand-sewing skills. Incorporating appliqué into a garment, even a small placement piece, adds color, depth, and richness to a project, elevating it from a classic to an elaborate one-of-a-kind.

With our Custom DIY options, you can mix and match fabric colors, stencils, and appliqué techniques for a variety of projects. Your custom design will then be cut and stenciled to your specifications and shipped to you, ready to sew. The above image of our Rose stencil appliqué with a simple whipstitch might be used all-over on the Camisole Dress for a special occasion garment, or sewn to a corner of our Market Bag for a subtle embellishment. The possible combinations are inspiring.

OUR DESIGN CHOICES

Fabric weight – Alabama Chanin 100% organic medium-weight cotton jersey
Base Fabric color – Dark Grey
Appliqué fabric color – Dove
Stencil – Rose
Embroidery technique – Appliqué with whipstitch—instructions available in Alabama Studio Sewing + Design
Button Craft thread – Slate

See our Custom DIY page to apply this colorway to one of 20 possible projects (or further customize to your liking).

Follow the Custom DIY Guide to build your own Custom DIY kit.

 

LOVING THE THREAD

LOVING THE THREAD - photo by Rinne Allen

This post grew out of a conversation about love that began around the sewing table at our Warehouse Row workshop in Chattanooga, Tennessee last month. While we have written about well-loved thread many times, it seems important to keep the conversation alive and growing.

Love…We all live for it, because of it, in search of it. Poets try to evoke it from paper and ink. Chefs strive to make you smell and taste it in their meals. And every Alabama Chanin workshop begins with the story of how love is sewn into each stitch of our clothing. Just one of our skirts may need hundreds of yards of thread and thousands of stitches to be completed. If you could watch the process of making that thread, you would see it comes from creating tension in two separate cotton strands and twisting them together. If that tension isn’t tamed before the sewing process, a seamstress will be facing knot after knot, each time the needle is pushed through the fabric. Just imagine what kind of frustration that could cause in the weeks it takes to make a single, hand-stitched garment.

LOVING THE THREAD - photo by Rinne Allen

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