LITTLE FOLKS

LITTLE FOLKS FABRIC MAP

Click on image to enlarge.

To create Little Folks: 1. Stencil fabric using Little Folks stencil and the stenciling technique of your choice. 2. Backstitch square shapes by stitching directly on stenciled edge. 3. Backstitch circle shapes inside of the flowers by stitching 1/8’ inside stenciled line and cut 1/8” outside of stenciled line. 4. Backstitch diamond shapes by stitching directly on stenciled edge and cut 1/8” inside diamond shape. 5. Backstitch flower shape then cut 1/8” inside the backstitch. 6. Whipstitch straight lines inside the flower shapes. 7. Add satin sequins using eyelet stitch. 8. Add French knots in between satin sequins.

 

LITTLE FLOWERS + LITTLE FOLKS (WITH ANNA MARIA HORNER)

LITTLE FLOWERS STENCIL - FABRIC DETAIL

Two years in the making, we are thrilled to officially introduce our Anna Maria Horner collaboration to Alabama Chanin’s Studio Style DIY. In-depth conversations, back-and-forth emails, and Nashville-Florence meetings with Anna Maria resulted in two textile pattern designs called “Little Flowers” and “Little Folks”.

Our collaborative process illustrates the infinite design possibilities that emerge when you start a conversation on design; our collaboration is an enlargement and elaboration of Anna Maria’s textile pattern: Little Folks.

I’ve been a fan of Anna Maria and her lively prints for years. Seeing the evolution of many of these prints into complete fabric collections made me curious to see what one would look like worked in our Alabama Chanin style. Little Folks had all the elements I was interested in incorporating into an Alabama Chanin design: simple forms, intricate detail, and repeating geometric patterns. This elemental approach focused on the essence of her design, evident in the laser-cut stencils.

LITTLE FLOWERS STENCIL- ANNA MARIA HORNER COLLABORATION

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YOU CAN’T FAKE FASHION (PART 2)

YOU CAN'T FAKE FASHION

In 2005, I was inducted into The Council of Fashion Designers of America.  Long before that time (and during my days as a stylist in Europe), I didn’t really know what the CFDA was (or did). However, the organization was founded in 1962 by Eleanor Lambert as a not-for-profit trade organization to support American womenswear, menswear, jewelry, and accessory designers. Today, the CFDA consists of over 400 members across the nation (we have 2 from Alabama). Their mission statement has grown to reflect a desire to “advance artistic and professional standards within the fashion industry, establish and maintain a code of ethics and practices of mutual benefit in professional, public, trade relations, promote and improve understanding and appreciation of the fashion arts through leadership in quality and taste, and to support the overall growth of American fashion as a global industry.”

Some of the programs growing out of this agency include the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund for which Alabama Chanin was a finalist in 2009 and which Billy Reid (the other CFDA member in the state of Alabama) won in 2010. Other programs include CFDA Fashion Awards, Made in Midtown, and the great {Fashion Incubator} program, among many others.

YOU CAN'T FAKE FASHION

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ANNA MARIA HORNER – NEEDLEWORKS NOTEBOOK

ANNA MARIA HORNER NEEDLEWORK NOTEBOOK

As most of our readers know, we have a deep love and admiration for our friend – and collaboratorAnna Maria Horner. She is an artist, fluent in more than one creative medium. She not only creates bold and unique fabrics, some of which we have adapted into Alabama Chanin garments, but she also designs kitchen and paper goods, writes, works as the spokesperson for Janome, and keeps up with her beautiful family, all while pregnant with baby #7.

As I read through my new copy of Anna Maria’s Needleworks Notebook, I was moved by her descriptions of family and creativity and how being surrounded by the beautiful handmade things they made influenced her life path. While my parents weren’t as prolifically artistic as Anna Maria’s, the stories of her grandmothers and their sewing resonate with me strongly.

ANNA MARIA HORNER NEEDLEWORK NOTEBOOK

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COLLECTION HIGHLIGHT

NEW COLLECTION HIGHLIGHTS

Our latest Alabama Chanin Collection features two original pieces – The Swing Coat and Layered Dolman Coat – and several classic patterns like the Alabama A-line dress and Long Skirt developed in new colorways and patterns.

Last summer we collaborated with friend and talent Anna Maria Horner on the Little Flowers stencil, which you’ll find on our Little Flowers Swing Coat and Little Flowers Dolman Coat. The Swing Coat, essentially a shorter version of our Long Coat, is fitted through the bodice with a gentle flare at the waist. Made in 100% organic lightweight cotton jersey, the Swing Coat measures 32” from the shoulder and shows off the simple beauty of backstitch reverse appliqué.

NEW COLLECTION HIGHLIGHTS

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TILLEKE SCHWARZ + A SKIRT

TILLEKE SCHWARZ + A SKIRT

Monday, we wrote about artist Tilleke Schwarz’s New Potatoes as inspiration for the week. However, Tilleke’s textiles have been a source for inspiration for me for years. When New Potatoes landed on my desk about a year ago, we started the skirt you see above as homage to Tilleke and her work.

We have produced narrative work over the years in the form of our Story Quilts. With that series, we take vintage quilts, refurbish them, and embroider oral histories onto the fabrics. You will find a Textile Stories Quilt project in Alabama Studio Style that describes this series. However, this series is small in comparison to the beautiful narrative work of Tilleke Schwartz.

TILLEKE SCHWARZ + A SKIRT - FABRIC DETAIL

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A RECIPE FOR INDIGO

A RECIPE FOR INDIGO

We have been working with indigo-dyed cotton jersey for years now. Between Father Andrew and Goods of Conscience in New York City and Artisan Natural Dyeworks in Nashville, Tennessee, there has never been a need for us to start our own indigo vat. And in the quantities we dye, it’s better to leave it to the experts. However, there has always been this little part of me that covets an indigo bath and I dream of one in our studio for “play.”

Since we set about exploring indigo this week, it seemed a perfect time to also explore recipes for a vat (which Father Andrew says is “very much like making beer”). While investigating recipes, I remembered a text message I received last fall from friends A.J. Mason and Jeff Moerchen about an indigo vat they created in the woods of upstate New York. Here they share the story of their vat:

A RECIPE FOR INDIGO

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NATURAL DYES + NEW FABRIC COLORS

NATURAL DYE HIGHLIGHTS

Natural dyes have been used for thousands of years by nearly every civilization; however, these days most natural versions have largely been replaced by synthetics. With consumers today demanding to know more about what they wear and where it comes from, there is a resurgence of people who are learning and practicing the art of natural dyeing.

Today, we launch a full range of Natural Dye Organic Cotton Jersey in nine shades, some old, some new, each made with a variety of natural plants and minerals.

NATURAL DYE HIGHLIGHTS

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TILLEKE SCHWARZ (+ INDIGO WEEK)

TILLEKE SCHWARZ: NEW POTATOES

I first saw Tilleke Schwarz’s work in an exhibition called Pricked: Extreme Embroidery at the Museum of Arts & Design in New York. The needlework was displayed proudly as contemporary art by extraordinary female artists. Boundaries were pushed as textile art was made. Friend, Maira Kalman, also had work on view.

Tilleke’s work resonated with me with its elaborate technique and profound artistic statement. At the time, her first book Mark Making (2007) had quickly sold out, so when her self-published second book, New Potatoes, came out a few years later I readily ordered 10 copies.

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HANDCRAFTED MODERN EUROPE: AT HOME WITH MIDCENTURY DESIGNERS

Leslie Williamson’s beautiful first book, Handcrafted Modern, captures several homes and interiors of some of the mid-twentieth century’s most loved architects and designers. The photos and essays blew us away and left us wanting for more. With a little more support for her Kickstarter campaign, we just might get to see her second book, Handcrafted Modern Europe, come to be.