Tag Archives: Collection

BARBEQUE COLLECTION

About this time last year, I agreed to create a barbeque inspired collection for our next Fall/Winter line – yes, that’s right, barbeque. Although it seems impossible, time moves SO QUICKLY and it is time to get started. John T. Edge is headed to our studio today to discuss the upcoming work, as the barbeque collection will be shown at the Southern Foodways Alliance Symposium in Oxford, Mississippi, next year.

In preparation for that collection, I have been working on a series of barbeque inspired Textile Stories Quilts for the Taste of the South auction next month.  When thinking about barbeque (and we have our share here in Florence), what better place to start than with Joe York’s film Cut Chop Cook.

I love this quote from barbeque master Roosevelt Scott (it starts at the 4:48 minute mark):

“After building the fire, while the fire is getting ready put the pig on the pit.  And after you put the pig on, when the coals get ready then you start putting the coal under the hog.

We take the shovel.  Scoop it in there.  Scoop up what we need.  Take it on the inside and we have an open door at each pit where we go under with the shovel and spread the heat at both the ham and the shoulders.  No where else.  And all the heat meets in the middle.

You hear folks all over say they use the wood.  But then they say they use wood chips, or they may use a few pieces of wood.  They might smoke for a little bit. This right here?  All wood.  Nothing else.  One hundred percent wood. Nothing but wood.

Cut. Chop. Cook.  It’s all right here.  In the wood.”

You can almost smell the barbeque.  Food for the soul:

CUT/CHOP/COOK from UM Media Documentary Projects on Vimeo.

 

MY FAVORITE BOLERO

MY FAVORITE BOLEROSara sometimes scolds me for referring to all of our pieces as my “favorite.” It’s a truthful statement though, since at one time or another each has been in heavy rotation in my wardrobe. I tend to get stuck on one garment at a time. I once spent an entire summer alternating between two identical tank dress. So, right now I would like you to meet my current obsession- the Bolero.

The Bolero is the absolute perfect piece for erratic Southern weather. The soft jersey fabric and slim cut mean it’s small enough to toss into my bag without sacrificing much space. In less than a week my amazing Bolero has saved me from a freezing restaurant, a subzero theater, and having to explain the meaning of my tattoos to my in-laws. With that sort of performance I feel like I’m completely justified in treating myself to another for the holidays!MY FAVORITE BOLERO

 

 

OPEN SOMETHING GOOD

Thank you to everyone who graciously showed their support for Alabama Chanin over this last week. Your purchases, emails, and love are the things that keep us going. It has been a wonderful (if sometimes difficult) year and we appreciate your incredible show of kindness and loyalty as we move towards the holidays and the end of the year. You make a difference.

Our team is working overtime to fill all of the orders, wrap beautiful packages, and get shipments out in the next days. Let us know if you have any questions or need a helping hand:

Email: office (at) alabamachanin.com or phone us Monday – Friday from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm CST at +1.256.760.1090

We are posting new collection pieces, projects, and products every day… plus, we have a few surprises up our sleeves.

Stay tuned by joining our mailing list,
xoNatalie

 

DOUGHNUTS + T-SHIRTS

While I was away having fun at the Southern Foodways Alliance Symposium last weekend, my daughter Maggie was working hard at eating doughnuts and designing t-shirts for our new children’s line.

The top design features a glass of “sweet tea” on the t-shirt front – not iced tea as it “has to be sweet to be tea.” This is from a girl who thinks that doughnuts should be considered a vegetable.

Our children’s line launches next month in New Orleans at Angelique Baby on Magazine Street as a part of our New Orleans and Ogden Museum traveling show.

I can’t wait to get back to NOLA.  See all of our upcoming events here.
xoNatalie

 

PERFECT FIT

More than any other time of year, the start of fall brings with it incredible rushes of nostalgia. The first chill usually arrives with distant memories, put away with last year’s winter coats.This light-weight piece is the first thing I reach for to welcome the returning season. Our Tied Wrap employs the simplest of designs. Rectangular layers of jersey drape across the shoulders and tie behind your back. The result? A tailored fit no matter your size. Fold it over for a beautiful muffler when the weather gets colder.

CHALLENGE

I can’t recall exactly where, but I once read an article that instructed the reader to dress in layers when attending an event. You were to shed these layers very very slowly. The idea was to take off one piece every hour (give or take, depending on the duration and your tolerance) until you were down to an incredible, shoulder baring party frock.

If ever there were a garment made for such a display it would have to be our beaded crisscross top. Rarely does a piece manage to look so elegant and refined while retaining a bit of an edge.

Black-tie, dive bar, or for those up to a challenge: both in one night, all eyes are on you-guaranteed.

SKIRT (AND TOP) + SKIRTS


Our most popular a-line skirt is a versatile piece that can pull double duty as an elegant swing top.  It is, as always, sewn and adorned by hand using our Anna’s Garden pattern in contrasting applique and glass bugle and chop beads.  You see it here styled with two long skirts for our collection photos:

Pleated Stripe Skirt in silt with white and sand colored applique (available for custom order),
and the Long Embroidered Skirt with negative reverse Anna’s Garden applique in white on white.

Of course, this is only one way to style the pieces. You will see members of our Alabama Chanin team mixing it up all the time, combining colors, patterns and styles. We encourage you to use your own sense of style. Don’t be afraid to show your creativity.


THE HEART

I once had a close friend who was the most incredible painter, yet never sold a single piece of art. I (and everyone who saw her work) was certain she was destined for artistic greatness and critical acclaim, if only she could get people to see her work. She thought it unfair and ridiculous to allow a gallery to take a commission on her sales when she did all of the work. As her collection grew, her apartment shrank, and I decided to play hero – or at least middle man.   That was free of charge.

Unfortunately, my efforts met with failure after failure; despite interested buyers, the deal always fell through. Mostly she claimed the piece was in need of some minor finishing then failed to follow up, refused to return calls. How could someone struggling with bills be so unmotivated that they couldn’t even schedule a time to collect some cash? Finally I realized (and after a couple of cocktails she admitted) that she had no intention of selling those paintings- they simply meant to much to her.

You’d be hard-pressed to find an artist who hasn’t experienced this sort of attachment to their art. Investing so much of your time and energy into a piece shapes the way you view and how much you appreciate it. When I begin a project that I know is destined for someone-somewhere else, I take a moment to focus on that fact; I take a moment to hope it will bring happiness to the wearer. Then, I let it go.

It’s hard to see a piece of our clothing in-person and not touch it – strangers have been known to sacrifice their understanding of personal boundaries on more than one occasion. The beauty of hand-stitching is almost shocking in its simplicity, and even the most perfect looking stitches are not- that’s the point. It is impossible to conceal the artistry and expression in a garment that has been made by human hands. Diane, our head seamstress (who you will meet later),  can tell you which one of our stitchers is responsible for a garment with a quick glance… we wonder if she can tell their mood as well.

Alabama Fur (in the picture above) is one of the most time-intensive treatments in the collection; it can take several weeks to complete an all-over application. Every time I run my hands across a sample of it I can’t help but think of how much time it spent with the artist who made it.  Was it put aside at the same time every day in the name of homework assistance? Did it suffer through the new season of True Blood, or help with any important decisions?

The Alabama Chanin collection (in the best case scenario) is made from cotton that is grown in Texas, spun in North Carolina, knit in South Carolina,  dyed in Tennessee and North Carolina, and sewn by our incredible Artists here in Alabama. I’d like to introduce you to the people that take part in the making of your Alabama Chanin pieces, those that cut your fabric, pack the boxes that are mailed to you, and those that hand-stitch our collection on their own terms and time.  Each garment is hand-numbered and signed by the artisan who assembled it. Who made your favorite piece? Check the tag, and if you’re inclined, say hello when he or she is featured. We love learning more about our friends, fans, and clients. We hope you enjoy getting to know us a little better during the upcoming months.