Tag Archives: Fashion

ALABAMA CHANIN IN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

ALABAMA CHANIN IN SAN FRANCISCO

San Francisco has long been a favorite city for Alabama Chanin, a place with long-standing friendships, and where we’ve met some of our biggest fans. This weekend and for a few days next week, Alabama Chanin is hosting a series of events in the city.

Join us:

Tonight, August 15, 2013
Southern at the Table

5:00pm – 8:00pm

Heath Ceramics
2900 18th Street
San Francisco, California 94110

The Southern Foodways Alliance highlights Southern food culture with a documentary on Tennessee barbecue pitmaster Helen Turner and we host a Southern at the Table marketplace featuring food products from small businesses throughout the South, including Jack Rudy, Farmer’s Daughter, Shotwell Candy Company, Anson Mills, Alabama Biscuit Company and Virginia Willis My Southern Pantry Heirloom Grits.

Twenty percent of Thursday evening’s sales will go to support La Cocina initiatives.

For more information on Southern at the Table visit here or contact office(at)alabamachanin.com.

August 15, 2013 – September 1, 2013
Home Trunk Show

Heath Ceramics
2900 18th Street
San Francisco, California 94110

A pop-up marketplace will be open in the Heath studio Thursday, August 15 through Monday, September 1, 2013, featuring gorgeous, hand sewn textiles for the table from Alabama Chanin, the new the Camellia dinnerware collaboration, and the continuation of the Southern food marketplace featuring southern-made goods including Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. Small Batch Tonic and Grenadine, Virginia Willis’ Stone Ground Grits, Alabama Biscuit Company’s Biscuit Mix, and others.

August 14, 2013 – August 26, 2013
Alabama Chanin Studio Style DIY Trunk Show (our first ever)

A Verb for Keeping Warm
6328 San Pablo Avenue
Oakland, CA 94608

Hours: Wednesday 11-7, Thursday 11-8, Friday 11-6, Saturday 10-6, Sunday 11-6, Monday 11-6, Tuesday Closed

Come see a variety of garments in various sizes, look through our swatch books, and imagine your DIY project. DIY kits, the Alabama Chanin Studio books, fabric and sewing notions will be for sale. 10% off DIY Kits. Bring in your Studio book (or buy a book) and receive 10% off Alabama Chanin organic cotton jersey fabric.

For more information, contact  A Verb for Keeping Warm: +1.510.595.8372

COLLECTION TRUNK SHOW

August 15, 2013 – August 16, 2013
Alabama Chanin Collection Trunk Show

Red Bird
By appointment only.

Special orders will be taken.
Contact: 510.644.0294

Saturday, August 17, 2013
One-Day Workshop

10:30 am – 5:30 pm

Heath Ceramics
2900 18th Street
San Francisco, California 94110

Our One-Day Workshop offers the Alabama Chanin experience in a casual, day-long session. Work with Natalie Chanin and our Alabama Chanin team to create one of our DIY Projects. Suited to beginners and experienced sewers alike.

SOLD OUT

For more information, contact Alabama Chanin: workshops (at) alabamachanin.com
or call Olivia at +1.256.760.1090

COLLECTION TRUNK SHOW

 

PATAGONIA: AN EXAMINED LIFE

Alabama Chanin has long looked to Patagonia, and Yvon Chouinard, as the standard for sustainable design, manufacturing, and corporate culture. The recent film “Legacy Look Book” (shown above) is a beautiful reminder of why we love this company so very much.

When Socrates said, “The unexamined life is not worth living,” he wasn’t implying that an unexamined life is boring or holds less meaning. He said the unexamined life is not worth living. As difficult as this process may be for an individual to understand and undertake, deciding that a company should live an “examined life” only adds to the challenge. It demands a carefully plotted and specific corporate mission, along with employing people who are willing to work openly, honestly, and for the right reasons.

PATAGONIA: AN EXAMINED LIFE

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DIY DRAPE DRAPE 3

DIY DRAPE DRAPE 3

For those of you who sew often, you likely understand how something as simple as draping fabric can also be very complex. For those of you who don’t, or who are novice sewers, the technique of fabric draping can involve more than just hanging fabric in a lovely way. It is not likely that a Roman emperor casually tossed a bed sheet over his shoulder one day and called it a toga, just as it isn’t likely that a lovely red carpet gown accidentally folds so perfectly around the waist of a posing starlet.

Technically, draping is the ability of a fabric to fall under its own weight into wavy folds. There are different strategies based upon the weight and stiffness of the fabric, its flexibility and tendency to stretch, and the general effect of gravity upon the fabric. Some softer, more flexible fabrics will make drapes that ripple and are more form fitting; stiffer and thicker fabrics will have less flow. When designing patterns, adding draping to your design increases the pattern-making difficulty immensely.

DIY DRAPE DRAPE 3

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THE HALTER TOP

THE HALTER TOP

In February, we launched our Basics line of Alabama Chanin garments in clean, unadorned silhouettes: garments for everyday life, to wear with everything. As temperatures climb into the 90’s here in North Alabama, the Basics have found their way into the wardrobe rotation more frequently, particularly the Halter Top.

Hand-stitched in 100% organic cotton medium-weight jersey, the Halter Top (shown here in our color, Denim) is a comfortable slip-on piece with an adjustable tie behind the neck, Cretan stitch finish on the rib, and a tapered, feminine fit through the chest and waist. Top hits at the hip, measuring approximately 23” from the center neckline and 17” from the back to bottom edge.

We love it with our Pleated Skirt or jeans or over a swimsuit on our way to the lake. The Halter Top comes in a variety of lightweight and medium-weight cotton jersey colors.

Wash gently + Hang to dry. Free shipping. Made in the USA.

Regular Price: $145

On Sale Today Only: $120

Place your order here, grab your sandals and (safely) enjoy the sun.

 

OVERDRESSED

OVERDRESSED

Last month we wrote about Slow Design, specifically in contrast to Fast Fashion, as the death toll from a collapsed garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh rose by the hour, reaching 1,127. During the three weeks the tragedy made headlines, NPR’s “Fresh Air” broadcast an interview with Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion, where Cline and Terry Gross discussed Overdressed and how the Dhaka tragedy has affected global consciousness of the Fast Fashion issue. The interview ushered us to (finally) read Cline’s book, and we’re glad we did.

Overdressed is often compared to Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma for its social influence, and is a book we feel is a necessary read for anyone wanting to better understand the negative impact Fast Fashion has on our environment, our humanity, and our personal carbon footprint.

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DIY MACHINE MANUFACTURING (IN ALABAMA)

DIY MANUFACTURING IN ALABAMA

We have written before about the rich manufacturing and textile history present in our community. The Shoals area and surrounding communities were working fabric and textile materials beginning in the late 1800’s. Those earlier years were often unkind to the mill workers and their families who worked long hours, lived in factory-owned apartments, and shopped in factory-owned stores. But, as the Industrial Revolution gave way to reform, textile manufacturing stayed in our community and flourished. Eventually, it was something that we in The Shoals were known for, as we were often called the “T-Shirt Capital of the World.”

Terry Wylie’s family founded Tee Jay’s Manufacturing Co. here in Florence in 1976, and in doing so became the foundation for a local industry. Whole families were known to work together, producing t-shirts and cotton products. Typical of our community, the company and the employees were loyal to one another. It was common for an employee to stay at Tee Jays for decades. Our Production Manager, Steven, worked for the Wylie family for years – for a time, working in the same building where Alabama Chanin is currently housed. It was this way until the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Tee Jays and other local manufacturers eventually shuttered all domestic manufacturing. It was an undeniably tough hit for a community that had “worked” cotton for most of its existence. Some of those who hand stitch for us once worked in mills and lost their jobs when plants here in Alabama closed and moved to cheaper locations. This move left our building, once a thriving manufacturing center, an empty shell, as you can see from the picture above. Machines like the ones below were moved elsewhere, and the resounding hum of our once busy manufacturing community was silenced.

DIY MANUFACTURING IN ALABAMA

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MAKESHIFT 2013 TUMBLR IMAGE QUILT

MAKESHIFT TUMBLR IMAGE QUILT

This year, with MAKESHIFT 2013, we expand ideas that were born from MAKESHIFT 2012 to create a global conversation among artists, designers, and makers. The first part of the MAKESHIFT 2013 SERIES took place at the Standard, East Village where panelists and conversation guides Cathy Bailey – Heath Ceramics, Rosanne Cash – Singer/Songwriter, Natalie Chanin – Alabama Chanin, Jessamyn Hatcher – Professor of Global Studies, NYU, Nathalie Jordi – People’s Pops/Writer/Author, Tift Merritt – Singer/Songwriter, Andrew Wagner – Krrb, and Kristen Wentrcek – Wintercheck Factory, shared their stories and experiences involving collaborative projects and making within their industries. Throughout the evening, guests were invited to express their thoughts from the conversations, literally or conceptually, using an organic cotton tote bag from Alabama Chanin as a blank canvas. A variety of materials were also provided to design, decorate, and customize each bag.

MAKESHIFT TUMBLR IMAGE QUILT TOTE Continue reading

MAKESHIFT 2013 @ THE STANDARD

MAKESHIFT STANDARD_24

“Craft” might seem like it’s for the amateurs, and “fashion” for the auteurs. Yet we live in an age where creativity and innovation are increasingly found in collaborations between makers and users, crafters and designers, designers and manufacturers, and in the loosening of the boundaries between them. – MAKESHIFT 2012

The MAKESHIFT conversation began last year to discover where and how various creative industries can work together as one. The discussion continued last Thursday evening at The Standard, addressing the intersection of industries on the artisan level, where the interchanges occur, and how we can transform those intersections through innovation and collaboration for the greater good.

MAKESHIFT STANDARD_21

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DIY PAISLEY TOTE

DIY PAISLEY TOTE

As this posts to our Journal this morning, part of our Alabama Chanin team will be in the air and on their way home from MAKESHIFT 2013. We hope that you have followed our explorations and conversations during New York Design Week via Instagram and have had conversations of your own.  Leaving MAKESHIFT this year, we are even more convinced about the importance of making, sharing, and finding common ground. You can expect a full recap of our experiences from New York Design Week in the next days, plus expanding conversations about design, fashion, food, craft, and DIY over the coming months.

One thing we do know is that, as we continue to open source our ideas, our Alabama Chanin conversations series and workshops will continue to grow.  These events—like MAKESHIFT—have become an intimate, extraordinary way for us to connect with fellow makers, designers, and like-minded creators across the country (and the world). See more in the coming weeks about the bag project we started at MAKESHIFT 2013.  In the meantime, here are some instructions for a different kind of bag (with an equally important message).

In the early spring of this year, Alabama Chanin designed and created a one-of-a-kind bag to support the Council of Fashion Designers of America’s “You Can’t Fake Fashion” campaign. We loved the finished product so much that I wanted my own version, adapting the OrganicTote Bag #3. This bag measures 17 1/2” x 13 3/4” x 4 3/4” and is large enough to use as a purse or laptop bag or to carry your sewing projects. The tote has been double-layer appliquéd all-over using our Paisley stencil in Alabama Indigo fabric.

The bag comes in Natural. We chose to customize this tote to match our CFDA bag by dyeing it indigo, but your design choices are endless.

DIY PAISLEY TOTE

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SLOW DESIGN

SLOW DESIGN

There may be no more relevant time than now to talk about Slow Design, specifically Slow Fashion, as the body count in a collapsed garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh – a factory that churned out Fast Fashion for American consumers – surpasses 900.

As we prepare to travel to New York for MAKESHIFT 2013 to discuss WHERE FASHION, FOOD, DESIGN, CRAFT + DIY INTERSECT and HOW WE define and TRANSFORM THE INTERSECTION OF FASHION, FOOD, DESIGN, CRAFT + DIY THROUGH INNOVATION AND COLLABORATION FOR THE BETTER GOOD, we find ourselves asking why MAKESHIFT might be relevant in the wake of the Dhaka, Bangladesh tragedy.

The Slow Design movement’s roots are based on the same premise as the Slow Food movement, both historically intellectual factions often viewed as exclusive clubs. (Penelope Green wrote a great article in the New York Times on Slow Design that brings the concept to a relatable level). Slow Food has become more democratic in recent years, thanks to the many chefs who dedicate their kitchens and menus to locally, sustainably grown produce and humanely raised meat (the fashion industry has a lot to learn from these guys). Planting home gardens and buying from local farmers markets has become a trend and good habit for many of us. We can feel and taste the personal benefits even when we can’t tangibly appreciate the long term benefits on our local economy and farm land.

Ironically, Fast Fashion was established with the “democratic” moniker, where the latest trends and styles on the runway are not just available to everyone, but sold with a bill of entitlement to own them. We buy clothes, wear them once, or until they wear out (too soon), and throw them in the landfill. Not only do we further the demise of our environment and negatively affect climate change, but now we see how our Fast Fashion habits affect innocent workers abroad. According to Elizabeth Cline in her book Over-Dressed, only 2% of clothing is made in the U.S. today, down from 50% in 1990. Roughly 41% of our clothing is made in China. Many of those garment factories are unregulated and built illegally, posing grave danger to those reporting for work every day, and for very low wages.

Alabama Chanin is built on the Slow philosophy. Everything we produce is slow. Our fabric is custom dyed, then cut by hand in the studio, stenciled by hand, packaged and distributed to local artisans who hand-stitch every garment from seam to appliqué to beaded embellishment. It takes roughly eight to ten weeks to produce a garment. The very nature of our process is in direct conflict with the predominant practice for delivering clothing to the masses.

When we hear chefs dedicated to using locally grown products talk about where their produce comes from, they always talk about relationships, about knowing their farmers. Transparency and collaboration appear to be at the heart of the Slow Food movement and it seems natural to expect the same of Slow Design and Slow Fashion. MAKESHIFT was born from the idea of shifting the way we make. In essence, it’s a shift in the way we consume as well. Small, sustainable and environmentally minded businesses can’t compete with mass-produced, low-cost goods, but through collaboration, great things are possible.

We talked to pirate Richard McCarthy last year about cultural assets and Slow movements, and the subject of sustaining local commodities, like food, came up. In the same way locally grown food is distributed through supermarket alternatives, like farmer’s markets, Slow Fashion may also need distribution alternatives. The opportunities for collaboration and innovation appear to be ripe, and necessary.

Our hope is to see the possibilities for collaborative growth and conversations around Slow Design and Slow Fashion become as common as our predilections for locally, sustainably grown food.

Follow us next week as we ask these important questions during MAKESHIFT 2013, and please share with us your ideas here on our journal.